Religion and Social Work in the North American Jewish Community

By B.H. Chetkow

Jewish Communal Service Association of North America (JCSA), June 1957

The author describes the reactions of the Orthodox, Reform and Conservative denominations of Judaism to the increasingly secularized and assimilating situation of Jews in North America, with an emphasis on the roles of synagogues and rabbis. He asserts that while there is some commonality between the roles of rabbi and social worker, there are also fundamental differences. Furthermore, the author explains, social workers and rabbis are somewhat reluctant to counsel their respective clients to make use of the other's skills and expertise. This ice is beginning to break, however, according to the author. In Journal of Jewish Communal Service, ed. by Sanford Sherman, v.33, no.4, Summer 1957, p.359-365.

Topic: Social Services, Rabbinic Counseling, Religious Denominations, Assimilation

Name of Publication: Journal of Jewish Communal Service

Editor: Sherman, Sanford N.

Volume/Issue: Vol. 33/No. 4

Page Number(s): 359-365

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Genre: Article

Coverage: United States

Language: English

Copyright Information: Download for personal use, freely distribute link

Bibliographic Information:
Chetkow, B.H.. Religion and Social Work in the North American Jewish Community. Journal of Jewish Communal Service. Jewish Communal Service Association of North America (JCSA). June 1957: 359-365. http://www.bjpa.org/Publications/details.cfm?PublicationID=1058


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