Building Community "along the Turnpike": The Unique Difficulties of a Populous Region

By Saul Schwarz

Jewish Communal Service Association of North America (JCSA), December 1984

It is axiomatic that urban decay breeds social disorganization. Once, the city was the hub of an areaĆ¢??economically, politically and even socially. It prided itself on its industry, its facilities, its institutions and its history. But centrifugal forces began to appear, and people and industry and all the elements which make for community health and vitality, especially young people, began to move out, leaving behind the elderly who were too poor to relocate, too old to make a change or unwilling to give up old memories or associations. A gulf was created between those Jews who remained and those who left. In Journal of Jewish Communal Service, v.61 no.2, Winter 1984.

Topic: Cities and Suburbs, Demography, Community Building

Name of Publication: Journal of Jewish Communal Service

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Genre: Article

Coverage: United States

Language: English

Copyright Information: Download for personal use, freely distribute link

Bibliographic Information:
Schwarz, Saul. Building Community "along the Turnpike": The Unique Difficulties of a Populous Region. Journal of Jewish Communal Service. Jewish Communal Service Association of North America (JCSA). December 1984: http://www.bjpa.org/Publications/details.cfm?PublicationID=1175


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