Personal Adjustment and Mental Health: Mental Disease Among Jews

By Benjamin Malzberg

Jewish Communal Service Association of North America (JCSA), National Conference of Jewish Social Service, September 1935

The author utilizes quantitative research to evaluate what was, at the time, a common stereotype: that Jews have higher rates of mental illness than non-Jews. Examining data in detail, the author concludes that, in fact, Jews had lower rates of mental illness than the general population, and that Jewish immigrants had lower rates of mental illness than other foreign-born white people. Within the mentally ill population, certain types of mental illness predominate among Jews, the author notes.

Topic: Stereotypes, Race, Psychology/Psychiatry, Mental Health, Genetics, Health and Healing, Research, Study

Name of Publication: The Jewish Social Service Quarterly

Editor: Bluhm, Solomon

Volume/Issue: Vol.12/no.1

Page Number(s): 185-191

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Genre: Article

Coverage: United States

Language: English

Copyright Holder: Publisher

Copyright Information: Download for personal use, freely distribute link

Bibliographic Information:
Malzberg, Benjamin. Personal Adjustment and Mental Health: Mental Disease Among Jews. The Jewish Social Service Quarterly. Jewish Communal Service Association of North America (JCSA),National Conference of Jewish Social Service. September 1935: 185-191. http://www.bjpa.org/Publications/details.cfm?PublicationID=12165


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