Long-Term Care Strategies in Industrialized Countries: Case Studies of Insurance Based and Non-Insurance Based Long-Term Care Systems

By Jack Habib, Jenny Brodsky, Miriam Hirschfeld

Myers-JDC-Brookdale Institute, 2003

Population aging, enabled mainly by advances in standards of living, medicine and technology, is one of the most significant achievements of the 20th century. It also presents new challenges to all societies. Demographic and epidemiological changes result in dramatic shifts in the health needs of the world's populations. Everywhere there has been a steep increase in the need for management of chronic diseases and for long-term care. At the same time, there has been a worldwide decline in the capacity of the informal support system to address these growing care needs. In most countries, care has traditionally been a family task - mainly performed by women. The increasing proportion of women in the labor market and the declining ratio between those needing care and those who are potential caregivers (the "daughter generation") are raising questions about the family’s ability to care for the elderly and disabled to the same extent.

Topic: Labor, Medical Care, Family, Disability and Special Needs, Health and Healing, Demography, Aging, Women, Elderly

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Genre: Report

Coverage: Israel

Language: English

Copyright Holder: Publisher

Copyright Information: Download for personal use, freely distribute link

Bibliographic Information:
Habib, Jack. Brodsky, Jenny. Hirschfeld, Miriam. Long-Term Care Strategies in Industrialized Countries: Case Studies of Insurance Based and Non-Insurance Based Long-Term Care Systems. Myers-JDC-Brookdale Institute. 2003: http://www.bjpa.org/Publications/details.cfm?PublicationID=13508


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