Dynamics of the Soviet Jewish Family: Its Impact on Clinical Practice for the Jewish Family Agency

By Phyllis Hulewat

Jewish Communal Service Association of North America (JCSA), September 1981

This article looks at the absorption of 80,000 Soviet Jews into American life. The author begins by outlining the dynamics of Soviet family life throughout the life cycle stages; he then reports on the Harvard study of displaced Soviets after World War II. Finally, he relates the patterns of personality traits identified to the resettlement process and suggests treatment implications. The author states that the Soviets were found to be more fearful of, and less optimistic about, those in authority than Americans. Yet leaders were expected to be warm, nurturing, and the source of initiative. These expectations may account for the ambivalent, hostile-dependent relationships that can be seen in immigrant clients toward authority in its many forms. In Journal of Jewish Communal Service, 58:1.

Topic: Social Services, Immigration, Psychology/Psychiatry

Name of Publication: Journal of Jewish Communal Service

Volume/Issue: Vol. 58/No. 1

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Genre: Article

Coverage: United States

Language: English

Copyright Information: Download for personal use, freely distribute link

Bibliographic Information:
Hulewat, Phyllis. Dynamics of the Soviet Jewish Family: Its Impact on Clinical Practice for the Jewish Family Agency. Journal of Jewish Communal Service. Jewish Communal Service Association of North America (JCSA). September 1981: http://www.bjpa.org/Publications/details.cfm?PublicationID=1901


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