Last night JTA celebrated the launch of its new digital archive, which now offers access to over 200,000 articles from its 90 years of reporting. Fittingly, the event was held at the Center for Jewish History and featured the usual set of hors d’oeuvres  and Jewish cocktails (i.e. kosher wine), as well as remarks from JTA Editor-in-Chief Ami Eden, Prof. Jonathan Sarna, and two writers describing how they have used the archive to unlock riches from the past. Sarna demonstrated how the archive can be used to access in-the-moment reporting on all of 20th century Jewish history, from the most significant events (such as its coverage of Israel’s declaration of independence) to the more banal (for example, the untold story of Jews and dolphins). In particular, Sarna emphasized JTA’s coverage of the unfolding of the Holocaust – often the only source to cover this atrocity as it was happening (at least in English – the Yiddish papers were much more attuned to it).

The connections between BJPA and JTA are strong. In addition to sharing a key funder (thank you as always, Charles H. Revson Foundation!), BJPA staff also served on the JTA Archive Experts Committee. But most importantly, BJPA and JTA share key founding principles. Both archives see themselves not simply as a static storehouse of historical material; both are also public educational tools that seek to use the past to create a more substantial and informed discourse on the Jewish community’s present and future. As BJPA director Prof. Steven Cohen said in a video produced for the event (see below), “for anyone who wants to see how Jewish history has meaning and implications for us today, we need the JTA historical archive.”

Like the BJPA, the JTA archive provides free and open access, and is very attentive to the user experience, offering multiple ways to engage with the site’s rich material – including different ways to browse, search, and save the archive’s material for future reference.

BJPA is pleased to welcome the JTA into the community of Jewish digital archives.